DJI Phantom 3 Standard – A NEW TOY!

I recently and finally bought a Phantom 3 standard, now that the price had dropped, originally these cost over £1000 and were well outside my budget.

I got mine from Curry’s UK at a bargain price of £420 (I price matched Jessops for a £30+ discount). Being the standard, it’s basic, but complete and ready to fly, and it can record up to 2.7K at 25FPS. Not only that, as you can see the picture quality IS truly remarkable. The only thing letting it down… the noobie operator.

I did a couple of test flights at home and in Keighley and I kept away from people and buildings. No major incidents and when it’s on basic flight mode, it’s actually easy to fly. It’s limited to just a few feet distance, 30 feet I think, and no more than 120 feet high, turn basic off and you’re left with a mental machine that CAN fly up to 8KM away (with a modded antenna), or with a normal antenna up to ½ a mile, still not too shabby at all. But that’s in perfect conditions, line-of-sight, no interference from radio or cell towers, no wifi and no bluetooth to screw things up. Throw these into the mix and distance is reduced, though I spoke to a guy today who said he’s had his P3 pro at 6,000 feet high!

There are LEGAL limitations though, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) will not let you fly within 50 feet of people, no higher than 400ft and no closer than 150ft to buildings. You can learn to pilot a drone at a CAA school and get a pilots commercial licence, and fly within these limits, but only with permission and a flight plan, then you need liability insurance too. The cost of these is prohibitive, the CAA licence is up to £1500 and the insurance is £500+ too. So drop £2000 if you want to earn a living from flying a drone, and that’s before you actually buy the thing, accessories and safety equipment.

That said, I’m only in this for the sheer enjoyment, so enjoy the video… excuse the noobiness and remember I’ve only had it a few days.

Install TightVNC Server on the Asus Tinker board

I’m making this post for my own reference, though you can obviously use it as you wish.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install xfonts-base
sudo apt-get install tightvncserver
sudo apt-get install nano

Run: vncserver
Add a password
My preferred command line option is vncserver -geometry 1280x720 (this sets the resolution to 720P)

I’m currently running Asus Linaro 1.8 debian based OS from a 120GB SSD and a using it as a Plex media server, for the most part it seems to work just fine, though some high bit rate 1080p movies struggle a little. I’m investigating further.

 

Installing a solid state drive or USB drive is as easy as the Raspberry Pi with just one slight difference. Plex Media server, HTOP, Webmin, Nextcloud and more are exactly the same, they just run a little better with the extra CPU power and extra 1GB of RAM.

Install Webmin on a Raspberry Pi

Webmin is a graphical user interface that can help you install, maintain and control your Raspberry Pi, all from a nice and simple GUI.

It’s also pretty easy to install and keep working, there are two methods to the install, I prefer the slightly longer but more thorough version, and that’s what I’ll be doing here.

  •  edit the sources list to add a new repository with:

sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

and add: deb http://download.webmin.com/download/repository sarge contrib

This has the benefit if updating Webmin in future when you type sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade.

Type/Copy these line one at a time:

  • sudo su
    cd /root
    wget http://www.webmin.com/jcameron-key.asc
    apt-key add jcameron-key.asc

You’ve now added a security key to your Pi for the repo.

Same again, type/copy these lines one at a time.

 

  • apt-get update
    apt-get install apt-transport-https
    apt-get install webmin

BOOM! And about 10 minutes later you should be able to login via a web browser. Use the raspberry Pi IP address.

Example: https://192.168.1.20:10000 and you’re in 🙂